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5-axis cnc cut photo

by:SNK     2019-09-22
How does this create a 5-
The project \"axis CNC cutting photos\" in partnership with James Yett uses the same method as 3d printing photos (
The concept works based on the diffuse reflection of a single light source on the surface.
When a surface is oriented so that it reflects the light source to your eyes, it seems to be a brighter color.
It looks darker when the light is reflected.
If the surface texture is fairly rough, you will have more diffuse reflection, and most of the brightness of the light is scattered.
This is most effective for darker materials because the brighter color absorbs less light and the light source is less visible.
If the surface is polished, you will get more mirror reflection and the light source will become brighter so that you can get a brighter color material.
To create a directional surface, I used Autodesk\'s Dynamo, which is a free graphical programming environment for Vasari or Revit (
Get Vasari free at www. autodeskvasari.
Www. com and Dynamodynamobim. org).
You also need to use Solidworks for HSMworks (www. hsmworks. com)
Generate 5-axis toolpaths.
Start by downloading and installing Vasari and Dynamo.
When you start Vasari for the first time, the project and family are written on the left.
Click the button that represents \"new concept quality.
Turn on the default \"mass \". rft\" template.
Vasari under \"add\"
The Ins tab, click the Dynamo button.
In the Dynamo window, open the file (provided below)cnccutphoto. dyn.
You will see the graphics program that created the image.
The image is read by the rgb pixel value in the list.
Convert rgb values to grayscale values.
These values are converted-
Our surface rotates x to x.
Create a grid that matches the number of pixels in the image and create a circle at each grid point.
Then rotate each circle according to the corresponding gray value.
The circle is squeezed as a surface for Solidworks to refer to its shape and normal.
The leftmost part of the Dynamo file is all the parameters for creating the image.
The first box, file path, is where to open the image file to be created.
Make sure the image is square, the gray contrast is good, and the number of pixels is uniform (30, 50, 100, etc. ).
I used photos of myself.
Next select the size of your image.
This is measured in millimeters from the center of the circle to the circle.
Select your Pixel number.
This needs to be the same number of pixels in the image, or it can be evenly divided.
The \"maximum rotation\" parameter is the maximum rotation of the surface of a black or white value.
15 degrees is a good start.
Overlap sets the radius or circle.
It\'s best to have each circle completely overlapping, or not overlapping at all.
Thickness will set the extrusion distance for each circle.
This will be the depth of your cut (1mm is good).
Finally, the file needs to be exported as SAT.
Set the last \"file path\" to where you want to save, and remember to keep the extension as \". sat\".
Each time you click Run, a new file is written to that path.
Start Solidworks and open.
SAT file you created.
It may take some time for Solidworks to translate geometry.
After translation, you should have a bunch of imported surfaces.
If your model is huge or small, Dynamo may get your unit wrong.
Open if not.
Sat file in the text editor and view the first number in line 3rd.
This is the model unit per mm.
If it is not 1, change it and save the file.
To set up the parts for machining, you need to start with the inventory geometry.
Start a sketch on the front plane and draw a box around the model.
Next, turn this sketch into a squeeze boss and make sure that the squeeze is thicker than your model in both directions.
Try to make the top surface as close as possible to the model geometry.
Click the jobs folder in the HSM tab to set up the project.
Set inventory to solid and select squeeze inventory (
You can hide it after this)
And load your machine configuration.
Make a 2d pocket now.
Choose a tool that is a little smaller than your circle, so the tool has room to clean up the pocket.
For working acrylic, I set the speed to 17,000 rpm and the cutting feed rate to 100 ipm.
I set the slope, the text in 75 into the speed.
For model geometry, select the bottom edge of the circle in the corner you want to start.
Then, for the direction of the tool, select the surface of the circle.
Remember to uncheck inventory to leave in the pass tab \".
I am the slope area and choose the \"plunge\" of the slope style \".
Now you have a pocket set up for a surface.
You can repeat these steps hundreds of times, but you don\'t have to repeat them.
Right-click the pocket tool path and click add to new folder \".
Then right-click the folder and click add mode \".
In the mode dialog box, select copy mode \".
Select the surface you set your pocket for reference and select the rest for replication.
You should have hundreds of 2d pockets now.
Run the machine simulation on the entire folder to make sure everything works and post the code!
I processed my product with 30 \"x30\" x1/4 \"black battery cast acrylic sheet.
Cast acrylic due to its polymer composition, it is considered to be more suitable for processing than extruded acrylic.
I drilled holes around the perimeter with a zero rake drill bit, added double stick tape to the bottom and screwed it to a mid-fiber board.
For an image of 50x50, the processing took about 7 hours in total, with 3/8 \"pockets \".
My speed and feedback may not be very good.
About 30% of my pockets are caused by overheating of plastic.
This is a problem with colored acrylic because the color disappears at higher temperatures.
I tried to polish the rough area with a flame without luck.
The work was eventually painted black, not just polished.
Even with a 3-axis CNC machine, there may be other ways to achieve the same result.
Feel free to try the code, geometry, software, and materials to see what else is possible.
The wood or metal version may look great.
Enjoy and remember to share what you have learned here!
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